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Which one is the freight locomotive? Diesel or Steam-liner? Art Peter Helck

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Hi-res digital file. Life Magazine, June 25, 1945.
An American Locomotive ad comparing Diesel and Steam-Liner.
Artwork by Peter Helck.

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Full-text transcript in the ITPC metadata.

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SKU: 109005 Categories: , , ,
Copyright and Credits

In the United States, anything  (like this ad), published without a copyright notice between 1923 and 1977 is in the public domain and is free to use.

It is unlikely, but not impossible that this ad's content is not in the Public Domain in other countries.
More info on our "Copyright and Public Domain" page.

Please notice that any advice or comment provided here is not and does not purport to be legal advice as defined by s.12 of Legal Services Act 2007.


Starting from the mid-thirties, many railroads in the United States were driven progressively out of business due to competition from buses, airlines, and Interstate highways.
The answer was the development of deluxe passenger trains, the streamliners. Some became legendary and profoundly influenced popular culture by focusing on concepts such as power, speed, technological progress, comfort, and luxury service.
Railroads’ advertisements, pamphlets, and even menus were extremely impacting, and it was not easy to select the best.

An excerpt from a Pennsylvania Railroads ad, which is an extraordinary blast into the spirit of the era.
“Capable of speed up to 120 miles an hour, this long streamlined giant not only marks another forward stride in the science of railroading — it is indicative of the spirit of progress in an industry vital to the welfare of America. now and in the future.”

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Celebrating American Technological Progress.

Starting from the mid-thirties, many railroads were driven progressively out of business due to competition from buses, airlines, and Interstate highways.
The answer was the development of deluxe passenger trains, the streamliners. Some became legendary and profoundly influenced popular culture by focusing on concepts such as power, speed, technological progress, comfort, and luxury service.

Railroads’ advertisements, pamphlets, and even menus were extremely impacting, and it was not easy to select the best. 
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  • A dream train comes True - Bohn ad. atwork by George W. Walker - Fortune. January 1943

    A Dream Train Comes True. Bohn Ad 1943. Futuristic Streamline. Art George Walker.

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    A Dream Train Comes True. Bohn Ad 1943. Futuristic Streamline. Art George Walker.

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    Vat added to EU customers.

    Hi-res digital file. Fortune Magazine, January 1943.
    A futuristic Bohn Aluminum and Braas ad forecasting the future of the streamlined train.
    Artwork by George W. Walker, an American industrial and automotive designer based in Detroit.

    Max-Quality jpg (5000x6580px, 13.7MB). 

     

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  • All the Comforts of Roam. American Railroads ad, artwork by James Bingham - Life. April 24, 1944

    All the Comforts of Roam. American Railroads Forecasting the Future 1944

    $12.00

    All the Comforts of Roam. American Railroads Forecasting the Future 1944

    $12.00

    Country Vat added to EU customers.


    Hi-res digital file. American Railroads ad published in Life Magazine on April 24, 1944.

    …The day is coming when a train trip will again be something to look forward to eagerly — something to be enjoyed at ease, in spacious comfort — and all at a moderate price.
    That of course will be after the war is won. It will be when the armed forces no longer need nearly half of all our passenger equipment to move fighting men. It will be when many coaches and Pullmans now busy in war service can be honorably retired to make way for new cars with comfort, convenience, and thoughtful appointments beyond anything the past has known…

    Max-Quality jpg (5000x6700px, 26.1MB). 
    Full-text transcript in the ITPC metadata

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  • Holiday for Two! New York Central Ad - Life. May 31, 1948

    Holidate for two! on New York Central’s New Luxury Coaches. Ad 1948

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    Holidate for two! on New York Central’s New Luxury Coaches. Ad 1948

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    Hi-res digital file. A New York Central ad published in Life Magazine, May 31, 1948.

    …We Couldn’t Budge on Our Budget! Water Level Route scenery’s a swell background for dining car meals. It makes great sightseeing, too, from the wide windows of our air-cooled coach. We’ll Have More to Spend at the Other End! Coach fares save us enough for extra vacation fun of our trip aboard the world’s largest new luxury coach fleet

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  • I Predict … by Lurelle Guild - The Weatherhead Company ad. artwork by Lurelle Guild

    I Predict…by Lurelle Guild. Forecasting the Future of railroads 1944

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    I Predict…by Lurelle Guild. Forecasting the Future of railroads 1944

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    Country Vat added to EU customers.


    Hi-res digital file. The Weatherhead Company ad published in Fortune in February 1944.
    Artwork by Lurelle Van Arsdale Guild, an architect, industrial and interior designer.

    …The railroad car of tomorrow will make today’s deluxe cars resemble the stagecoach by comparison. I have designed for one of the country’s largest railroads a train embodying numerous new and practical features, including super-efficient heating and cooling to eliminate dust, germs, and draft…

    Max-Quality jpg (5000x6580px, 11.8MB). 
    Full-text transcript in the ITPC metadata

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  • I Predict … by Lurelle Guild - The Weatherhead Company ad. artwork by Lurelle Guild

    I Predict…by Lurelle Guild. Forecasting the Future of railroads 1944

    $12.00

    I Predict…by Lurelle Guild. Forecasting the Future of railroads 1944

    $12.00

    Country Vat added to EU customers.


    Hi-res digital file. The Weatherhead Company ad published in Fortune in February 1944.
    Artwork by Lurelle Van Arsdale Guild, an architect, industrial and interior designer.

    …The railroad car of tomorrow will make today’s deluxe cars resemble the stagecoach by comparison. I have designed for one of the country’s largest railroads a train embodying numerous new and practical features, including super-efficient heating and cooling to eliminate dust, germs, and draft…

    Max-Quality jpg (5000x6580px, 11.8MB). 
    Full-text transcript in the ITPC metadata

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  • All the Comforts of Roam. American Railroads ad, artwork by James Bingham - Life. April 24, 1944

    All the Comforts of Roam. American Railroads Forecasting the Future 1944

    $12.00

    All the Comforts of Roam. American Railroads Forecasting the Future 1944

    $12.00

    Country Vat added to EU customers.


    Hi-res digital file. American Railroads ad published in Life Magazine on April 24, 1944.

    …The day is coming when a train trip will again be something to look forward to eagerly — something to be enjoyed at ease, in spacious comfort — and all at a moderate price.
    That of course will be after the war is won. It will be when the armed forces no longer need nearly half of all our passenger equipment to move fighting men. It will be when many coaches and Pullmans now busy in war service can be honorably retired to make way for new cars with comfort, convenience, and thoughtful appointments beyond anything the past has known…

    Max-Quality jpg (5000x6700px, 26.1MB). 
    Full-text transcript in the ITPC metadata

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  • Trains of thought for the Future. American Railroads ad - Life. March 27, 1944

    Train of Thought for the Future. American Railroads Streamline 1947. Hi-Res file

    $12.00

    Train of Thought for the Future. American Railroads Streamline 1947. Hi-Res file

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    Hi-res digital file. American Railroads ad published in Life Magazine on March 27, 1944.

    …Someday this war will be won by America and her Allies.
    Our first duty meanwhile is to meet the demands of the war. This we are doing.
    And we’d like you to know our ideas of comfort and style go far beyond what we’re able to offer today. That’s why we print the picture below….

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  • It's years ahead of schedule. General Motor's Exciting New Train of Tomorrow. artwork by John Clymer - Life. June 16, 1947

    It’s years ahead of schedule. General Motor’s Exciting New Train of Tomorrow. 1946

    $12.00

    It’s years ahead of schedule. General Motor’s Exciting New Train of Tomorrow. 1946

    $12.00

    Country Vat added to EU customers.


    Hi-res digital file. Ad published in Life Magazine on June 16, 1947.

    …Conceived by General Motors engineers and stylists, this new train, from the powerful Diesel locomotive to its unique and beautiful observation car, is packed throughout with vivid and stimulating ideas for future travel pleasure. Among these, there is the Astra Dome, a 32-foot glass-enclosed observation deck built into the roof of every car—giving passengers a giraffe’s-eye view of the passing landscape and skyscape….

    Max-Quality jpg (6700x5000px, 27.4MB). 
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